The Women’s Prizes announce the Inaugural Women’s Prize for Non-Fiction Shortlist

The six shortlisted Women's Prize for Non-Fiction titles stacked on a white table.

The Women’s Prize for Non-Fiction – the inaugural international celebration of women’s non-fiction writing – today unveils the shortlist for its 2024 Prize. The six books cover a broad range of subjects: from life writing, religion, art and history, to AI, social media and online politics. What unites them is an originality of voice and an ability to turn complex ideas and personal trauma into inventive, compelling and immersive prose.

The shortlist

The 2024 shortlist takes readers to new places and introduces new perspectives, offering an alternative lens through which we can examine our past, present and impending future. Revelatory stories that uncover the voices of the dispossessed, sit alongside personal testaments of oppression that reveal resilience and courage. There are also works of groundbreaking investigative journalism that challenge the systems that govern us, alongside visionary accounts that pay tribute to the liberating potential of literature and art.

The shortlist represents writers from America (Tiya Miles), Canada (Naomi Klein) and Jamaica (Safiya Sinclair), with half the list from the UK (Laura Cumming, Noreen Masud and Madhumita Murgia).

The judges

Chair of judges Professor Suzannah Lipscomb says:

Our magnificent shortlist is made up of six powerful, impressive books that are characterised by the brilliance and beauty of their writing and which each offer a unique, original perspective. The readers of these books will never see the world – be it through art, history, landscape, politics, religion or technology – the same again.

Professor Lipscomb is joined on the judging panel by fair fashion campaigner Venetia La Manna; academic, author and consultant Professor Nicola Rollock; biographer and journalist Anne Sebba; and author and 2018 winner of the Women’s Prize for Fiction Kamila Shamsie.

The judges narrowed down this shortlist to six books from a longlist of 16. The 2024 Women’s Prize for Non-Fiction will be awarded on Thursday 13 June 2024 at the Women’s Prize Trust’s summer party in central London. The winner will receive a cheque for £30,000 and a limited-edition artwork known as the ‘Charlotte’, both gifted by the Charlotte Aitken Trust.

More information can be found on the Women’s Prizes website here.

Get involved

If you work in a library or workplace and would like to promote the shortlist, you can download a free digital pack from our shop.

What do you think of the 2024 shortlisted titles? Which have you read and what will be added to your TBR pile? Add your comments below, or click any title above to leave a review.

Share your thoughts with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using #WomensPrize.

Keep up with all the latest news on the Women’s Prize website.

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Publishers invited to The Reading Agency Insights events to tackle big health challenges through reading

The Reading Agency is hosting a series of free online events for publishers, sharing insights and data from ten years of Reading Well book selection and co-production work. The sessions will demonstrate the power of books and reading to support health and wellbeing, offering new insights to add value to health publishing.

Launching on 30 April, the first of three Reading Agency Insights events will provide publishers with crucial consumer data, learning and expertise to help address the current UK health challenges. The series is part of a wider Reading Well development programme funded by Arts Council England.

Mental health services in England received a record 4.6 million referrals during 2022, up 22% from 2019 according to the BMA. Children and young people’s mental health is in crisis, with over 1.4m children estimated to have a mental health disorder (The King’s Fund).  Publishers, reading, and libraries are part of the solution, adding value to health service provision by building public understanding and confidence in health management through quality-assured, authentic and helpful reading; 81% of people surveyed say their Reading Well book helped them to understand more about their health needs.

The first online event will feature contributions from leading experts Professor Martin Marshall CBE, Chair of the Nuffield Trust, and former chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners, as well as NHS GP and media personality, Dr Radha Modgil. Attendees will hear new data about reader needs, evidence on what works best in publishing, and what makes health information books more accessible and inclusive. With over ten years of consumer insight data to draw on, The Reading Agency will also share knowledge about gaps in health publishing linked to unmet reader need, along with reader insights on books with strong themes relating to mental and physical health, including fiction titles and memoirs. Future events in the series will focus on children’s and adult mental health and dementia.

“This events series provides a unique opportunity for publishers to access crucial data and insights direct from readers and experts. Working together, we can ensure books meet the needs of readers facing health challenges and help tackle the current crisis.”

Following the first event in April, two further events will take place in June focusing specifically on children’s and adult mental health.

Karen Napier, CEO, The Reading Agency

All publishers are invited to attend. To register:

  • The Reading Agency Insights: Tackling Big Health Challenges Together, 30th April, 12.30pm – 1.30pm Book your space 
  • The Reading Agency Insights: Supporting Young Minds, 5th June 12.30pm – 1.30pm Book your space  
  • The Reading Agency Insights: Improving Adult Health, 25th June 12.30pm – 1.30pm Book your space  

The Summer Reading Challenge’s ‘Marvellous Makers’ theme celebrates children’s creativity 

Graphic with illustrated children on grass. Text reads: Summer Reading Challenge 2024 delivered in partnership with libraries - Marvellous Makers.

The Reading Agency is excited to announce the theme for this year’s Summer Reading Challenge: Marvellous Makers! Developed in partnership with Create, a leading charity bringing the creative arts to those who need it most, this year’s Challenge aims to fire up children’s imaginations and unleash storytelling and creativity through the power of reading.  

The annual Challenge is delivered in partnership with public libraries, and it’s free to take part. From June to September, children taking part in ‘Marvellous Makers’ can discover new stories, join in with free activities at the library, and explore their creativity – from junk modelling to music, dance to drawing and painting. 

This year’s bespoke illustrations are created by Natelle Quek, celebrated illustrator of titles including Wild Wild Wood (Puffin Books) and I Am Nefertiti (Five Quills). Taking place in libraries and online, the Summer Reading Challenge provides the perfect opportunity for active minds to explore, imagine, and create in a supportive and engaging environment. 

Reading sparks imagination and creativity, helping to expose children to new ideas, perspectives, and experiences that fire up their minds. The Summer Reading Challenge aims to harness these creative thinking skills and build confidence in young readers during the school holiday when they aren’t in the classroom. Participation encourages children to read for pleasure, with books providing knowledge and giving children the tools and confidence to think originally, play with concepts, and express their creativity in unique ways. 

This year’s ‘Marvellous Makers’ theme will inspire children’s inner storytellers, motivating them to be curious and to tell their own stories through various creative outlets. The partnership with Create aims to allow children to understand and appreciate creativity through reading. The partnership will provide a range of exciting activities and resources that bring reading and creativity together, empowering children to become ‘Marvellous Makers’ themselves.  

“The Summer Reading Challenge is all about inspiring children’s creativity and imagination through reading. Developed in partnership with the fantastic charity Create, this year’s theme will spark children’s inner storytellers and makers. Reading fires up young minds, and we’re thrilled to provide a fun, engaging environment for children to explore new ideas and perspectives through books and creative activities over the summer holidays. We are delighted to be working with Blue Peter to encourage even more children to take part this year.”

Karen Napier, CEO, The Reading Agency

“This year’s Summer Reading Challenge is a fantastic opportunity to bring creativity to young people across the country. People need to create, and everyone deserves access to the life-enhancing power of the creative arts. ‘Marvellous Makers’ brilliantly combines the joy of reading and the wonder of creativity, providing young people with new opportunities to express themselves. We couldn’t be more excited to be part of it.” 

Nicky Goulder, Founding CEO of Create

Blue Peter will also be encouraging primary school children across the UK to join this year’s Summer Reading challenge on CBBC and iPlayer with creative activities and features from the Blue Peter Book Club. 

The Summer Reading Challenge launches on 22 June in Scotland and online and 6 July in England and Wales.  

The Booker Prizes Announce the International Booker Prize 2024 longlist

Today, 11 March, the 2024 longlist for the International Booker Prize, the world’s most significant award for a single work of translated fiction, is announced.

Featuring “books that speak of courage and kindness, of the vital importance of community, and of the effects of standing up to tyranny’” according to Fiammetta Rocco, Administrator of the International Booker Prize, the list introduces readers to the best novels and short story collections from around the world that have been translated into English and published in the UK and/or Ireland.

The longlist

  • Not a River by Selva Almada, translated from Spanish by Annie McDermott
  • Simpatía by Rodrigo Blanco Calderón, translated from Spanish by Noel Hernández González and Daniel Hahn
  • Kairos by Jenny Erpenbeck, translated from German by Michael Hofmann
  • The Details by Ia Genberg, translated from Swedish by Kira Josefsson
  • White Nights by Urszula Honek, translated from Polish by Kate Webster
  • Mater 2-10 by Hwang Sok-yong, translated from Korean by Sora Kim-Russell and Youngjae Josephine Bae
  • A Dictator Calls by Ismail Kadare, translated from Albanian by John Hodgson
  • The Silver Bone: The Kyiv Mysteries by Andrey Kurkov, translated from Russian by Boris Dralyuk
  • What I’d Rather Not Think About by Jente Posthuma, translated from Dutch by Sarah Timmer Harvey
  • Lost on Me by Veronica Raimo, translated from Italian by Leah Janeczko
  • The House on Via Gemito by Domenico Starnone, translated from Italian by Oonagh Stransky
  • Crooked Plow by Itamar Vieira Junior, translated from Portuguese by Johnny Lorenz
  • Undiscovered by Gabriela Wiener, translated from Spanish by Julia Sanches

The 2024 longlist features books translated from ten original languages: Albanian, Dutch, German, Italian, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Swedish including four books written by South American authors, with books representing Brazil, Argentina, Peru and Venezuela. While some authors and their books might be unfamiliar to English-speaking readers, many are considered to be their respective countries’ greatest living writers

A variety of fictional forms are represented on this year’s longlist: from magical realism to autofiction, from allegory to short stories, from books that span multiple generations to one constructed around a three-minute conversation. Several titles are rooted in family life, from the relationship between fathers and sons to daughters and mothers, from separated twins to orphanhood.

The judges

The 13 books on the longlist have been chosen by the 2024 judging panel: broadcaster and journalist Eleanor Wachtel as chair; award-winning poet Natalie Diaz; Booker Prize-shortlisted novelist Romesh Gunesekera; groundbreaking visual artist William Kentridge; and writer, editor and translator Aaron Robertson.

Eleanor Wachtel, International Booker Prize 2024 Chair of judges, says:

From a protest on the top of a factory chimney in South Korea to a transformative fishing trip in remote Argentina, from the violent streets of Kyiv in 1919 to a devastating sexual relationship in 1980s East Berlin, our longlisted books offer stunning evocations of place and time. Here are voices that reflect original angles of observation. In compelling, at times lyrical modes of expression, they tell stories that give us insight into – among other things – the ways political power drives our lives.

What my fellow jurors and I hoped to find are books that, together, we could recommend to English-speaking readers. After narrowing down 149 submitted titles to these 13, we are delighted to say, “Here, we’ve scoured the world and brought back these gifts.

The six books shortlisted for this year’s prize will be announced on Tuesday, 9 April, 2024. The announcement of the winning book for 2024 will take place at a ceremony in London on Tuesday, 21 May, 2024, which will be livestreamed.

The prize recognises the vital work of translators with the £50,000 prize money divided equally: £25,000 for the author and £25,000 for the translator (or divided equally between multiple translators). In addition, there is a prize of £5,000 for each of the shortlisted titles: £2,500 for the author and £2,500 for the translator (or divided equally between multiple translators).

For more information, visit the Booker Prizes website.

The International Booker Prize 2024 Reading Challenge

This year to coincide with the longlist, the prize is launching a new Reading Challenge to encourage readers to explore the 2024 longlist, share their thoughts, and connect with readers from around the world.

The prize is looking for three librarians from the UK and Ireland who are passionate about translated fiction to become Reading Challenge Ambassadors to read as many longlisted titles as they can ahead of the winner announcement on 21 May. The Ambassadors will be featured on the Booker Prizes and The Reading Agency’s channels, and have the chance to win tickets to the International Booker Prize 2024 ceremony.

Find out more and apply today.

Librarians can also pick up a free POS pack to celebrate the Reading Challenge in their libraries from our shop.

Get involved

If you work in a library or workplace and would like to promote the longlist, you can download a free digital pack from our shop.

What do you think of the 2024 longlisted titles? Which have you read and what will be added to your TBR pile? Add your comments below, or click any title above to leave a review.

Share your thoughts with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using

Keep up with all the latest news on the Booker Prizes website.

Want to make sure you never miss the latest reading group news? Sign up for our free monthly newsletter.

Women’s Prize for Fiction announces 2024 Longlist

The Women’s Prize Trust – the UK charity which creates equitable opportunities for women in the world of books – today announces the longlist for the 2024 Women’s Prize for Fiction. Now in its 29th year and sponsored by Audible and Baileys, the Prize shines a spotlight on outstanding, ambitious, original fiction written in English by women from anywhere in the world.

The longlist

The 2024 longlist features eight debut novelists (Maya Binyam, Effie Black, Alicia Elliott, Kate Foster, Mirinae Lee, Chetna Maroo, Aube Rey Lescure and Pam Williams), four authors who have previously published one novel (V.V. Ganeshananthan, Isabella Hammad, Peace Adzo Medie, and Megan Nolan), alongside four writers who have multiple books to their name (Anne Enright, Kate Grenville, Claire Kilroy and Karen Lord). Kate Grenville, who won the Women’s Prize for Fiction in 2001 (The Idea of Perfection), sits alongside Anne Enright, the first Laureate for Irish Fiction, who was longlisted in 2008 (The Gathering) and 2020 (Actress) and shortlisted in 2012 (The Forgotten Waltz) and 2016 (The Green Road). V.V. Ganeshananthan was also longlisted in 2009 for her first novel (Love Marriage).

Out of the 16 longlisted authors, there are five British writers, three Americans, three Irish, one Barbadian, one South Korean, one Australian, one Ghanaian and one French/American. The longlist is globe-spanning, location-moving and time-hopping: we move from Korea’s turbulent history to sub-Saharan Africa, from Sri Lanka during the Civil War to rural New South Wales in the 19th Century. In one novel we are dropped deep into the contemporary tensions of the West Bank, in another we find ourselves in the midst of the Chinese economic boom. We are even immersed in the serve, volley, drive and shot of a squash court.

Independent publishers make a strong showing this year, with seven represented on the list. Époque, a small independent, and Gollancz, the established UK-based publisher of science fiction, fantasy and horror, both have titles longlisted for the first time, with Duckworth celebrating a second longlisting in two consecutive years. Legend Press and Pushkin Press both mark their third successful longlisting, whilst two other independents who have previously won the Prize also feature: Faber & Faber most recently with Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver in 2023 and Oneworld with An American Marriage by Tayari Jones in 2019.

The judges

This year, bestselling author and chair of the 2024 judging panel Monica Ali is joined by author Ayọb̀ ámi Adébáyọ; author and illustrator Laura Dockrill; actor Indira Varma; and presenter and author Anna Whitehouse.

Monica Ali says:

With the strength and vitality of contemporary women’s fiction very much in evidence, reading the entries for this year’s Women’s Prize for Fiction has been a joyful experience. Of course this made it all the more difficult to select the longlist, but after much lively discussion amongst the judges we are delighted with the 16 titles selected. Each one of these books is brilliant, original and utterly unputdownable. Collectively, they offer a wide array of compelling narratives from around the world, written with verve, wit, passion and compassion. They are books that will engage readers’ hearts and minds, they are filled with indelible characters, and they do what stories can do so powerfully: unsettle and disturb as well as surprise and delight.

These judges will narrow down this longlist of 16 books to a shortlist of six, which will be announced on 24 April 2024. The winner of the 2024 Women’s Prize for Fiction will be awarded on Thursday 13 June 2024 at the Women’s Prize Trust’s summer party in central London, along with the winner of the 2024 Women’s Prize for Non-Fiction. The winner will receive a cheque for £30,000, anonymously endowed, along with a limited-edition bronze statuette known as the ‘Bessie’, created and donated by the artist Grizel Niven.

More information can be found on the Women’s Prizes website here.

Get involved

If you work in a library or workplace and would like to promote the longlist, you can download a free digital pack from our shop.

What do you think of the 2024 longlisted titles? Which have you read and what will be added to your TBR pile? Add your comments below, or click any title above to leave a review.

Share your thoughts with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using #WomensPrize.

Keep up with all the latest news on the Women’s Prizes website.

Want to make sure you never miss the latest reading group news? Sign up for our free monthly newsletter.

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