Women’s Prize for Fiction Announces 2021 Shortlist

The Women’s Prize for Fiction – one of the biggest annual, international celebrations of women’s creativity – has announced its 2021 shortlist. Now in its 26th year, the Prize honours outstanding, ambitious, original fiction written in English by women from anywhere in the world.

The shortlist

This year’s shortlist has been selected by the chair of judges Bernardine Evaristo and her judging panel, author and journalist Elizabeth Day; TV and radio presenter, journalist and writer, Vick Hope; print columnist and writer, Nesrine Malik; and news presenter and broadcaster, Sarah-Jane Mee.

Chair of judges and novelist Bernardine Evaristo says:

“Coming up with a longlist of sixteen books for this prize was relatively easy compared to whittling the selection down to six novels, why by necessity demands more consensus. Sadly. we had to lose so many exceptional books that we loved. However, with this shortlist, we are excited to present a gloriously varied and thematically rich exploration of women’s fiction at its finest. These novels will take the reader from a rural Britain left behind to the underbelly of a community in Barbados; from inside the hectic performance of social media to inside a family best by addition and oppression; from a tale of racial hierarchy in America to a mind-expanding tale of altered perceptions. Fiction by women defies easy categorisation or stereotyping, and all of these novels grapple with society’s big issues expressed through thrilling storytelling. We feel passionate about them, and we hope readers do too.”

The winner of the 2021 Women’s Prize for Fiction will be awarded on Wednesday 7 July 2021.

The Women’s Prize will be hosting a Virtual Shortlist Festival on Monday 14, Tuesday 15, Wednesday 16 June, 7.30pm, featuring Live Q&As with the shortlisted authors. These events will be hosted by Kate Mosse, Founder Director of the Prize, and will present readings from well-known actors. Tickets can be bought via Eventbrite.

Get involved

See the 2021 Prize longlist.

What do you think of the 2021 shortlisted titles? Which have you read and what will be added to your TBR pile? Add your comments below, or click any title above to leave a review.

Share your thoughts with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using #WomensPrize.

Keep up with all the latest news on the Women’s Prize website.

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Re-reading puts a smile on the nation’s face, says new survey by The Reading Agency

* Over 1 in 3 (35%) of people find happiness in re-reading books

* 53% of people have re-read at least one book in the last 12 months

* Young people (18-24) more likely to re-read, and to feel happy re-reading

* Crime, sci-fi and memoirs among the most re-read genres

* People revisit books for comfort, relaxation, escapism, (re)discovery, familiarity

* Survey results by The Reading Agency to mark World Book Night, in partnership with Specsavers

The Reading Agency, in partnership with Specsavers, has revealed today that re-reading helps make people smile, with more than 1 in 3 readers (35%) finding happiness in re-reading books (including audiobooks), rising to 41% among young people (18-24).

Announced on World Book Night, the annual celebration of reading, the survey shows that we are a nation of re-readers, with more than half of people surveyed (53%) saying they have re-read at least one book over the past 12 months (Populus Omnibus survey, books and audiobooks, 16-18 April 2021, sample 1,638).

Marking its 10th anniversary in 2021, the theme of this year’s World Book Night is “Books To Make You Smile”, highlighting the proven power of reading and the benefits it brings to well-being, especially in light of the impact of Covid-19 on mental health. As such, The Reading Agency and Specsavers have compiled a new anthology “Stories to Make You Smile”, featuring contributions from some of the UK’s best-loved comedians and authors.

This is timely when considering the reasons those surveyed gave for re-reading books, including wanting to feel happy, comforted or relaxed; escaping reality; discovering aspects they hadn’t noticed before; and re-reading feeling familiar. This supports recent studies which have found people find enjoyment in the familiar and predictable, particularly during periods of constant change.

The study found younger people are more likely to re-read a book, as 61% of 18-24-year-olds have re-read a book in the last 12 months, and 75% re-read books generally, while 46% of readers aged 65 and above have re-read a book in the past year.

Re-reading can help form new perspectives and better self-understanding – much like talking to new people – so it is unsurprising that, in the past year, young readers (18-24) and readers aged over 65, groups who became more socially isolated, were most likely to re-read to discover different aspects they hadn’t noticed before (42% and 46% respectively). Readers aged between 25-34 and 35-44 were more likely to re-read to feel relaxed (47% and 46% respectively).

Responses from people surveyed included:

“If I love a story I want to revisit it, like visiting a friend more than once.”

“I like to rediscover the emotions I felt on first reading the book, especially during 2020, familiar ‘feel good’ books.”

“I haven’t re-read many but the ones I did were just so good I wanted to experience them again.”

The most popular genre people revisit is crime (39%), proving a favourite among over 65s (52%), and peaking in popularity in Scotland and Yorkshire & Humberside (47% and 48% respectively). Among the young (18-24-year-olds), sci-fi and fantasy are the top re-read genres (41%), followed by young adult fiction (37%). Sci-fi is also the second most re-read genre for men (38%), while for women it’s romance (34%). Re-reading non-fiction is also very popular, with 30% respondents enjoying re-reading memoirs and biographies and 23% political or historical non-fiction.

Karen Napier, CEO of The Reading Agency, said: “We’re delighted to see that so many people have taken comfort and joy in re-reading books in the last year – and it makes perfect sense that many would return to their old favourites in such uncertain times. The proven power of reading is something we strongly believe in at The Reading Agency, and these statistics help shine a light on just how many people can benefit from it. We’re looking forward to a great evening of celebrations, and can’t wait to help get the nation smiling, with help from our fantastic partner Specsavers, our brilliant ambassador Sandi Toksvig, and all the wonderfully supportive publishers and authors who are helping us celebrate this 10th anniversary!”

Celebrations for World Book Night’s 10th anniversary include two virtual events in partnership with The British Library: a livestreamed event by World Book Night Ambassador Sandi Toksvig featuring best-selling authors David Nicholls and Bolu Babalola, and World Book Night founder and Canongate CEO Jamie Byng (8-9pm), and a virtual event with Nobel Prize-winner Kazuo Ishiguro in conversation with Kate Mosse (6-7pm). In addition, The Reading Agency is inviting the whole nation to take part in the #ReadingHour (7-8pm), where everyone is encouraged to read a good book, alone or with others, in any format they like.

Sandi Toksvig, World Book Night 2021 Ambassador, said: “I’m not surprised at all that people have been finding comfort and happiness in re-reading books over the past year. If a book makes you smile when you read it the first time, why not repeat the experience over and over again? The Reading Agency’s World Book Night, in partnership with Specsavers, is celebrating its 10th anniversary so I hope everyone will join us for an evening of seriously entertaining free events and the Reading Hour, celebrating the joy of reading (and re-reading) books.”

The survey also showed that 45-54-year-olds are more likely to have started wearing glasses to help with reading in the past 12 months (15%, in comparison to 8% for general respondents and 4% of 65+ year olds). 50% of the people surveyed said they were already wearing glasses.

Dame Mary Perkins, Co-founder of Specsavers, said: “Reading is one of my great passions and I return to my favourite books time and time again – these results demonstrate I’m not alone. Of course this year, more than ever, being able to escape with a good book has been a lifeline and having something to smile about, particularly during these challenging times, is essential. Books give you the chance to unleash your imagination and be transported to another world and having good vision and hearing is so important for this – whether you are reading the words on a page or sharing a story with a loved one. At Specsavers we’re delighted to be working with The Reading Agency to support World Book Night, and with our ongoing commitment to eye health, helping people enjoy their love of reading to the fullest.”

On World Book Night, The Reading Agency will be giving away 100,000 books in various formats – twice as many as last year. The Reading Agency’s mission is to spread the joy of reading to those who don’t regularly read for pleasure or have access to books, by distributing books to organisations such as prisons, hospitals, food banks, youth centres, care homes and mental health groups. Authors on the World Book Night booklist 2021 include Pam Ayres, Stephen King, Jack Monroe, Nina Stibbe, Jane Fallon, gal-dem, Kit de Waal, and many more. In addition to the booklist, The Reading Agency and Canongate will be distributing 10,000 copies of The Midnight Library, by international best-selling author and mental health advocate Matt Haig, to 10 library authorities.

On top of print books, The Reading Agency is giving away 6,000 free audiobooks, as part of their efforts to make reading available to the widest possible audience. This year’s audiobooks include Emma by Jane Austen, narrated by Tanya Reynolds, BBC Audio’s Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, narrated by David Tennant and Samantha Spiro and Shahroo Izadi’s The Kindness Method. Anyone can apply online to receive an exclusive download code for an audiobook of their choice.

Stories to Make You Smile (published by Simon & Schuster) has been edited by writer, former Costa Book Award judge and Quick Reads editor Fanny Blake, and featuring contributions from high-profile comedians and authors Richard Madeley, Jenny Éclair, Helen Lederer, Mark Watson, Eva Verde, Vaseem Khan and more. The book is available in various formats, including a free e-book available to download from today, and an audiobook narrated by Hugh Bonneville (Downton Abbey, Notting Hill), Adjoa Andoh (Bridgerton, Doctor Who), Samantha Bond (Downton Abbey, James Bond) and Madhav Sharma (Eastenders, Coronation Street), also free to download and available from World Book Night.

For World Book Night, The Reading Agency is planning a Bookshop.org partnership, with authors sharing their reading recommendations for World Book Night (and beyond) on the online platform supporting independent bookshops. Waterstones will also be partnering up with The Reading Agency, supporting the #ReadingHour on social media and offering prize giveaways.

Follow the latest developments on social media:

@WorldBookNight / @ReadingAgency / @Specsavers

#WorldBookNight / #ReadingHour / #BooksToMakeYouSmile

2021 International Booker Prize Shortlist Announced

The judges of the 2021 International Booker Prize have revealed the six shortlisted books in contention for the prize, which celebrates the finest translated fiction from around the world. The shortlist was announced on The Booker Prizes social media and website.

The shortlist

At Night All Blood is Black by David Diop, translated from French by Anna Moschovakis

The Dangers of Smoking in Bed by Mariana Enríquez, translated from Spanish by Megan McDowell

When We Cease to Understand the World by Benjamín Labatut Adrian, translated from Spanish by Nathan West

The Employees by Olga Ravn, translated by Danish by Martin Aitken

In Memory of Memory by Maria Stepanova, translated from Russian by Sasha Dugdale

The War of the Poor by Éric Vuillard translated from French by Mark Polizzotti

This year’s shortlist features titles translated from four languages: Spanish, French, Russian and Danish, with their authors hailing from five different countries. Within the impressive shortlist are stories tackling themes of war, human cruelty, urban myth, scientific advancement, workers’ protest, and a longing for humanity and human connection. Whether set in 16th-century Europe or 22nd-century outer space, the books share an urgent relevance.

Two-thirds of the shortlisted authors are published in English for the first time, having already won awards in their own languages. Revolutionary in form, in content and in point of view, the books on this year’s shortlist are all urgent, energetic and wildly original works of literature. The stories told include: terrifying tales of unruly teenagers, crooked witches, homeless ghosts, and hungry women set in contemporary Argentina; the historical account of two Senegalese soldiers fighting for France during the first world war; the lives of the crew working on the Six-Thousand Ship in the 22nd century; stories of the defining moments from the history of science; the exploration of cultural and personal memory, using the author’s Jewish family in Russia as the basis; and a tale of rebellion against
power and privilege set during the Protestant Reformation in 16th-century Germany.

What the judges said

Lucy Hughes-Hallett, chair of the judges, says: ‘Our six shortlisted books, chosen from 125 submissions, are all extraordinary, and wildly unlike each other. We have the genres of sci-fi and ghost-stories being brilliantly subverted and repurposed. We have biographical essays opening out to become blazingly imaginative testaments to the strangeness of the universe or the cruelty of human injustice. We have a hallucinatory and terrifying vision of the madness of warfare. We have a meditative journey into a family’s history that becomes a profoundly moving story about the way time eventually bears us all away. To arrive at this list we had – regretfully – to eliminate numerous books we enjoyed and admired. These six, though, seemed to us outstanding. Their differences demonstrate how vital the art of fiction is worldwide. What they have in common is their beauty, their originality and their power to grip the reader and excite new thoughts. It is a privilege to be part of a prize that spreads the word about such remarkable books to English-speaking readers, that looks beyond national boundaries to honour authors wherever they come from, and that rewards the translators who reveal their work to us.’

Tell us about your reading

Are you reading, or planning to read, any books from the International Booker Prize longlist? We’d love to hear from you! Tell us what you’re reading, where you get your recommendations from and what you think in this short survey.
h3. Get involved

Listen to the brilliant Booker Prize Podcast with Joe Haddow.

Have you read any of the longlisted books? Share your thoughts with us on Twitter and Instagram using #FinestFiction and #2021InternationalBooker, or click on a title above to leave a review.

For more information, visit the Booker Prize website.

Want to make sure you never miss the latest reading group news? Sign up for our free monthly newsletter.

The Power of Reading: how books can help to tackle life’s challenges

At The Reading Agency we work every day towards a world where everyone is reading their way to a better life. We mean everyone – irrespective of age or economic background. Reading can tackle life’s big challenges, from social mobility to mental health – and in 2019-20, The Reading Agency reached over 1.8 million people across the UK.

The benefits of reading have been proven time and again with clear evidence, finding that reading for pleasure enhances empathy, understanding of the self, and the ability to understand one’s own and others’ identities.

The rise of loneliness in the UK is a challenge that our Read, Talk, Share initiative is currently tackling, supporting the nation’s wellbeing through the proven power of reading during the Covid-19 pandemic and recovery.

Read, Talk, Share, enabled by a £3.5 million award by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS), has expanded The Reading Agency’s successful Reading Well and Reading Friends programmes: initiatives that demonstrate the power of reading to support and connect isolated individuals and improve mental health.

Reading Well’s mental health book collections are now available in every library in England as part of the Read, Talk, Share campaign, with many titles available as eBooks and audiobooks – so that everyone can access the support they need.

Ensuring that everyone can feel the positive impacts of reading on health and wellbeing is so important to us, which is why we connected with Calibre Audio.

Calibre Audio share the ambition of The Reading Agency for as many people as possible to benefit from the sense of wellbeing that reading can bring. The aim at Calibre Audio is to bring the joy of reading to all and provide a completely free audiobook service for anyone with a disability that makes reading print difficult.

Providing accessible audiobooks has proven to be especially necessary during the recent lockdowns when so many of our readers have been isolated or without regular contact and connection. In times like these, audiobooks have such an important role to play and have been described by members as a ‘lifeline’.

“This has certainly helped to make isolation more bearable. It is such a relief to hear a wallet drop through the letterbox. It means that for a few hours one can escape from all the present problems.” – Calibre Audio member.

Only a small percentage of print books are converted to accessible audio, the format needed for people with print or reading disabilities, yet the demand for audio is on the rise. Sight loss is expected to rise from 2 to 4 million by 2050, dementia expected to rise to over 1 million by 2025, and it’s estimated that 6 million people in the UK are dyslexic.

For children and young people who struggle with reading, whether they have dyslexia, a visual impairment or a disability that makes reading print difficult, a lack of access to books can have serious implications on their ability to learn and develop. It can also be very isolating and have impacts on their confidence, independence and self-worth.

“My son is so grateful that he is able to listen to his school reading book that is not available anywhere else. He finds it so hard to read and now he can keep up with his classmates thanks to you.” – parent of a Calibre Audio member.

It’s so important for accessible audiobooks to continue to be produced, whether the books are specifically tailored for self-help and mental health, or simply for the act of enjoyment and escapism into the realm of story. In March this year Calibre Audio focused on Reading for Wellbeing, looking at the ways reading can help, from books that make you laugh to those that help you confront concerns. We plan to add more titles to our collection later this year, such as the excellent range available on The Reading Agency’s Reading Well Booklist, which are available at your local library.

Calibre Audio provides a free audiobook service for anyone who finds reading print difficult. Find out more here.

2021 International Booker Prize longlist announced

On 30 March, the judges of the 2021 International Booker Prize reveal the 13 novels longlisted for the prestigious award which celebrates the finest translated fiction from around the world.

Complementing The Booker Prize for Fiction, the prize is awarded every year for a single book that is translated into English and published in the UK or Ireland. It aims to encourage more publishing and reading of quality works of imagination from all over the world, and to give greater recognition to the role of translators. Both novels and short-story collections are eligible. The contribution of both author and translator is given equal recognition, with the £50,000 prize split evenly between them. Each shortlisted author and translator also receives £1,000, bringing the total value of the prize to £62,000.

h2. The longlist

This year the judges considered 125 books.

The full 2021 International Booker longlist is:

The judges

The longlist was selected by the 2021 judging panel consisting of: cultural historian and novelist, Lucy Hughes-Hallett (chair); journalist and writer, Aida Edemariam; Man Booker shortlisted novelist, Neel Mukherjee; Professor of the History of Slavery, Olivette Otele; and poet, translator and biographer, George Szirtes.

Lucy Hughes-Hallett says:

“In a year when we could scarcely leave our own houses, we judges have been crossing continents, transported by our reading. Every book we’ve read is unique. However a theme does emerge – migration, the pain of it, but also the fruitful interconnectedness of the modern world.

Not all writers stay in their native countries. Many do, and write wonderful fiction about their hometowns. But our longlist includes a Czech/Polish author’s vision of a drug-fuelled Swedish underworld, a Dutch author from Chile writing in Spanish about German and Danish scientists, and a Senegalese author writing from France about Africans fighting in a European war.

Authors cross borders, and so do books, refusing to stay put in rigidly separated categories. We’ve read books that were like biographies, like myths, like essays, like meditations, like works of history – each one transformed into a work of fiction by the creative energy of the author’s imagination.

Thanks to those remarkable books, and to their translators, we’ve been freed to explore the world. We hope this prize will inspire many more readers to follow us.”

The shortlist for the prize will be announced on 22 April 2021, and the winner announced on 2 June 2021 in a virtual celebration from Coventry, City of Culture 2021.

Get involved

Listen to the brilliant Booker Prize podcast with Joe Haddow.

Have you read any of the longlisted books? Share your thoughts with us on Twitter and Instagram using #FinestFiction and #2021InternationalBooker, or click on a title above to leave a review.

For more information, visit the Booker Prize website.

Sandi Toksvig revealed as Lead Ambassador for World Book Night’s 10th Anniversary

The Reading Agency, in partnership with Specsavers, is delighted to announce that writer, comedian, TV personality and literacy advocate Sandi Toksvig will be the lead ambassador for World Book Night 2021, as the full plans for the campaign are also unveiled.

World Book Night, the annual celebration of reading, will take place on Friday 23rd April 2021. This year’s theme, “Books To Make You Smile” is a response to the impact of Covid-19 on mental health, highlighting the proven power of reading and the benefits it brings to well-being. This also coincides with the launch of “Stories to Make You Smile” – a new collection of short stories compiled by The Reading Agency together with Specsavers.

To mark its 10th anniversary this year World Book Night will be hosting a number of virtual events, book giveaways, online activities, exclusive releases and promotions, calling for the whole nation to celebrate reading for pleasure. Over the last ten years, The Reading Agency has distributed over 2,800,000 books to help spread the joy of reading, with 245 titles by 205 authors distributed by over 90,000 volunteers and organisations across the UK. As lockdown gradually eases, The Reading Agency encourages everyone to share the pleasure of reading whether virtually or safely in person, as bookshops and libraries are due to re-open from Monday 12th April, and book clubs will be able to meet again outdoors.

Celebrations on World Book Night itself will be marked by a live-streamed event in partnership with The British Library, hosted by World Book Night Ambassador Sandi Toksvig and featuring best-selling authors David Nicholls and Bolu Babalola, and World Book Night founder and Canongate CEO Jamie Byng (8-9pm).

Prior to the event, The Reading Agency is inviting the whole nation to join the #ReadingHour (7-8pm), when everyone is encouraged to spend time with a good book, alone or with others, reading in any format they want and wherever they like. Last year, the estimated social media reach of #WorldBookNight and #ReadingHour was 14.3 million.

Celebrations on the night itself will also include a virtual event hosted by The British Library, featuring Nobel Prize-winner Kazuo Ishiguro in conversation with Kate Mosse, bestselling author of The City of Tears and founder of the Women’s Prize for Fiction (6-7pm). Ishiguro, who was a World Book Night author in 2012, will be discussing his new novel Klara and the Sun as well as the wider impact of his writing on readers.

Sandi Toksvig, World Book Night 2021 Ambassador, said:

“I am so excited to be the lead ambassador for The Reading Agency’s World Book Night 2021 campaign, bringing the nation together to celebrate the power of books and reading on Friday 23rd April. This year marks the campaign’s 10th anniversary, and it feels more important than ever to celebrate the power of reading to inspire, entertain and challenge. We all could do with some light relief from reality which is why this year’s theme “Books to Make You Smile” is so perfect. It’s great to have the support of Specsavers on this vital campaign, who have teamed up with The Reading Agency as they pursue their mission to improve lives through reading.”

Karen Napier, CEO of The Reading Agency, said:

“We’re hugely excited to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of World Book Night with such a fantastic array of events. Given the challenges of the past year, our theme feels particularly resonant, and we’re immensely grateful for the support from authors, publishers, bookshops and libraries to help spread the proven power of reading. We plan for this year’s World Book Night to be the biggest and best yet, and look forward to celebrating the Reading Hour with people across the country, ahead of what we’re sure will be a brilliant live-streamed event at The British Library – which is sure to make us all smile!”

As well as online activities, The Reading Agency has commissioned a new collection of short stories exclusively for World Book Night 2021, Stories to Make You Smile (published by Simon & Schuster). The commissioned book is edited by writer, former Costa Book Award judge and Quick Reads editor Fanny Blake, and featuring contributions from high-profile comedians and authors Richard Madeley, Jenny Éclair, Helen Lederer, Mark Watson, Eva Verde, Vaseem Khan and more.

Now available for pre-order in various formats, Stories to Make You Smile will be released on World Book Night, with 3,000 copies of the book being given out to customers through Specsavers competitions and giveaways, a free e-book version available to download on the day, and the audiobook narrated by Hugh Bonneville (Downton Abbey, Notting Hill), Adjoa Andoh (Bridgerton, Doctor Who) and Samantha Bond (Downton Abbey, James Bond) available for pre-order now ahead of release on World Book Night.

Dame Mary Perkins, Co-founder of Specsavers, said:

“Reading is such a popular past-time with so many people and is certainly a passion of mine. This year, more than ever, being able to escape with a good book has been a lifeline and having something to smile about, particularly during these challenging times, is essential. Which is why Specsavers is delighted to be working with The Reading Agency to help make that possible by bringing you, not only good vision, but Stories to Make You Smile.”

On World Book Night, The Reading Agency will be giving away 100,000 books in various formats – twice as many as last year. The Reading Agency’s mission is to spread the joy of reading to those who don’t regularly read for pleasure or have access to books, by distributing books to organisations such as prisons, hospitals, food banks, youth centres, care homes and mental health groups. Organisations receiving books this year include UNISON, Citizens Advice, Women’s Aid, Sanctuary Housing, Home-Start and many more. With a focus on well-being and mental health, the 2021 WBN booklist features Pam Ayres, Stephen King, Jack Monroe, Nina Stibbe, Jane Fallon, gal-dem, Kit de Waal, and many more. In addition to the booklist, The Reading Agency and Canongate will be distributing 10,000 copies of The Midnight Library, by international best-selling author and mental health advocate Matt Haig, to 10 library authorities.

In addition to print books, The Reading Agency is giving away 6,000 free audiobooks, as part of their efforts to make reading available to the widest possible audience. This year’s audiobooks include Emma by Jane Austen, narrated by Tanya Reynolds, BBC Audio’s Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, narrated by David Tennant and Samantha Spiro and Shahroo Izadi’s The Kindness Method. Anyone can apply online to receive an exclusive download code for an audiobook of their choice.

Author Stephen King said:

“I’m very pleased that Elevation has been chosen for World Book Night. It’s one of my favourites, probably because it suggests that good people can still bridge the divide between differing points of view and find a path to acceptance.”

Author Nina Stibbe said:

“I am thrilled that Reasons To Be Cheerful has been chosen for World Book Night in its 10th year, 2021. I have long admired this wonderful project that celebrates books and finds new readers throughout our communities. This year, in particular, we have been reminded of the transformative power of reading and the difference books can make to our state of mind. Being part of World Book Night 2021is one of my proudest moments.”

Author Jane Fallon said:

“I’m delighted that Faking Friends has been selected for World Book Night. Reading is a lifeline, a lifesaver. Everyone should have access to books, whatever their circumstances. We all need escapism more than ever now.”

For World Book Night, The Reading Agency is planning a Bookshop.org partnership, with authors sharing their reading recommendations for World Book Night (and beyond) on the online platform supporting independent bookshops. Waterstones will also be partnering up with The Reading Agency, supporting the #ReadingHour on social media and offering prize giveaways.

Get Involved

Book your ticket to World Book Night presents: Books to Make You Smile here

Book your ticket to Kazuo Ishiguro in conversation with Kate Mosse here

(Please note that bookers for World Book Night presents: Books to Make you Smile will also be sent a link to watch Kazuo Ishiguro in conversation with Kate Mosse, and vice versa. The events are both free, but booking is essential).

Follow the latest developments on social media:
@WorldBookNight / @ReadingAgency / @Specsavers
#WorldBookNight / #ReadingHour/ #BooksToMakeYouSmile

The Reading Agency

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